Photos of the Old Rotation

The experiment was placed on the National Register of Historical Places in 1988 as the oldest, continuous cotton study in the United States.  Today, we know it is the oldest in the world.

The experiment was placed on the National Register of Historical Places in 1988 as the oldest, continuous cotton study in the United States. Today, we know it is the oldest in the world.

A view of the Old Rotation in 1996 looking South with  plot 1 (continuous cotton with no N and no winter cover crop) in the foreground.

A view of the Old Rotation in 1996 looking South with plot 1 (continuous cotton with no N and no winter cover crop) in the foreground.

View of the Old Rotation in August, 2014, looking South from a UAV.  Some of the treatments are identified.

View of the Old Rotation in August, 2014, looking South from a UAV. Some of the treatments are identified.

Plots 7 (left) and 6 (right) in July, 2013.  The only difference is that plot 7 receives a winter legume cover crop each year.

Plots 7 (left) and 6 (right) in July, 2013. The only difference is that plot 7 receives a winter legume cover crop each year.

Cotton on plot 6 in 2006 made some of the highest yields ever for continuous cotton with no N.

Cotton on plot 6 in 2006 made some of the highest yields ever for continuous cotton with no N.

Crimson clover was planted as the winter legume cover crop during most of the 1990s and 2000s.

Crimson clover was planted as the winter legume cover crop during most of the 1990s and 2000s.

Wheat and ‘AU Merit’ hairy vetch on March 17, 2015

Wheat and ‘AU Merit’ hairy vetch on March 17, 2015

Cotton planted into vetch residue in 2015

Cotton planted into vetch residue in 2015

With cotton yields exceeding 2000 pounds lint per acre on some irrigated plots, late-season K deficiencies began to appear as seen in this photo from plot 9 (cotton-corn rotation with winter legume plus fertilizer N) in 2007.

With cotton yields exceeding 2000 pounds lint per acre on some irrigated plots, late-season K deficiencies began to appear as seen in this photo from plot 9 (cotton-corn rotation with winter legume plus fertilizer N) in 2007.

Planting cotton on plot 6 (no cover crop).

Planting cotton on plot 6 (no cover crop).

Measuring soil compaction across the row with a set of 5 soil cone penetrometers in December, 2014.

Measuring soil compaction across the row with a set of 5 soil cone penetrometers in December, 2014.

Harvesting cotton on the Old Rotation on 11 October 2011, with a circa 1960, one-row cotton picker.

Harvesting cotton on the Old Rotation on 11 October 2011, with a circa 1960, one-row cotton picker.

On May 6, corn is up and growing while cotton is yet to be planted into the crimson clover residue on the left.

On May 6, corn is up and growing while cotton is yet to be planted into the crimson clover residue on the left.